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We are Chartered Physiotherapists - specialising in musculoskeletal pain management and rehabilitation. Offering you fast, effective pain relief and improved physical functioning.

Peripheral Nerve Pain Explained

nervous systemPeripheral nerve pain may result from what is commonly referred to as “Trapped Nerves.” In this blog, I have outlined a few key points in relation to peripheral nerve pain and what to expect in relation to recovery and symptoms.

What are Peripheral Nerves?

The nervous system in the body is divided into two parts the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The central system consists of the brain and the spinal cord. The peripheral system is made up of the peripheral nerves. The peripheral nerves exit the spinal column at the various levels from the spinal cord and each nerve supplies a different part of the body i.e. a muscle, area of skin and/or organs. The peripheral nerves send sensory information to the brain and spinal column to tell the brain - for example the hands or feet are cold, that the object touched is sharp or that a joint or muscle is sore. The peripheral nerves also send signals to the muscles from the brain and spinal cord in order to generate an intended movement, for example, writing or walking. So basically the peripheral nerves communicate information back and forth from the muscles and organs to the central nervous system in order for tasks and functions to be carried out.

(Image courtesy of: Häggström, Mikael. "Medical gallery of Mikael Häggström 2014")

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What is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and its potential role in Pain Management?

physiotherapy pain assessment dublinAcceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a form of therapy which can be used to treat many different conditions such as depression, anxiety and pain. It is best described as:

Getting to know unpleasant feelings, then learning not to act upon them (Noam, 2010)

ACT gets its name from its two core messages:

  1. Accept what is out of your personal control – in this context, pain.
  2. Commit to action that improves and enriches life

ACT utilises three key mechanisms:

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Pelvic Pain Mythology Exposed

pelvic pain“My pelvis goes in and out of place!” or “my sacrum has gone out!” can be common beliefs for people who suffer from pelvic or lower back pain. This topic was discussed by Dr. Peter O’Sullivan, one of the leading back pain researches, in a recent BJSM podcast.  

As it turns out, up to date research would suggest this is an illusion and there is no evidence to prove that the pelvis or sacrum can in fact go in or out of place, or anywhere else for that matter! 

The facts based on research are as follows:

1. The pelvis and the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) joint are very secure and stable joints and move very little.

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How Pilates has benefited my Chartered Physiotherapy Practise?

Pilates has greatly benefited my Physiotherapy practise as well as benefiting me personally.

Pilates300xFirstly, being knowledgeable in Pilates and the different exercises involved in Pilates has equipped me with another valuable treatment tool. Pilates is very useful in therapeutic exercise prescription and choosing the most valuable and beneficial exercises to address the client’s particular physical problem.

Secondly, being a trained Pilates Instructor has increased my ability to identify abnormal patterns of movement in clients which may be contributing to their pain symptoms for example. When teaching Pilates, I am constantly observing the way people move to ensure that they are moving in the correct way. As a result I have become more observant in my clinical practice in recognising abnormal movements caused by muscles may be weak or overactive, joints which may be ‘stiff’ or overly mobile as well as issues relating to the nervous system’s control of the body.

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New Pilates Schedule Starting January 2015

pilates-300Our next Pilates course schedule starts on the 12th January and includes our usual Beginner, Improver, Advanced and Aerobilates level classes, plus this term we have introduced a Maintenance and a Relaxation class. 

To view our course schedule please visit our website here - http://mmphysiopilates.com/dublin/join-a-class.html

To learn more about the competency/ difficulty level for the different classes see here - Level Descriptions 

How to join a class

Signing up for one of our courses is very simple. We have a secure online booking system where you can choose your class, register and pay using a debit, laser or credit card to reserve your place immediately. You will receive instant confirmation of the success of your booking.

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Why I Use Medical Acupuncture (including Dry Needling) In The Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Patellar-TendonMedical Acupuncture (MA) is a form of therapy in which fine needles are inserted into specific points on the body to bring about various processes within the body. Benefits include pain relief, tissue healing and tension release from tight muscles.

What is Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS)?

PFPS is a term used to describe pain in and around the knee cap (patella) (Brukner & Khan, 2007). It is also known as ‘Anterior knee pain’, ‘Patellofemoral maltracking Syndrome’ and ‘Chondromalacia Patellae’ (Brukner & Khan, 2007). It is often cause by muscle imbalance and biomechanical dysfunction of the lower limb coupled with and increased activity load on the knee.

Aims of treatment

The overall aim is to allow the knee and and knee cap to move and function as normally as possible to as to remove mechanical stresses which may lead to the development of or perpetuate the symptoms of PFPS.

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Scans For Your Back Pain – Are They Really Necessary?

imaging-back-scanLow back pain is very common in the general population with approximately 80% of people experiencing back pain at some point in their lives (Daulat, 2013). Many people with back pain are anxious to have a scan to investigate the apparent cause of their pain. 

According to Timothy Maus, an American Researcher:

“Imaging is an integral part of the clinical examination of the patient with back pain; it is, however, often used excessively and without consideration of the underlying literature” (Maus, 2010).
Image courtesy of Jan Ainali / wikipedia.org
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My First Week At Mount Merrion Physiotherapy

My first two weeks of induction at Mount Merrion Physiotherapy were spent mostly with Katie and Simon in preparation for Katie's departure and my first official week.

Last week I officially took over from Katie and it was great to get started on my own and to meet many clients as well as to start teaching on the new summer term of Pilates.

My induction weeks were undoubtedly beneficial and I am very grateful to Simon and Katie for all their effort and time making this transition a smooth one. I really enjoyed my first official week and I am delighted to be a part of the Mount Merrion team.

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Do You Suffer From "Unexplained" Chronic Pain?

pain-unexplainedOver the years the scientific understanding of "unexplained" chronic pain has increased. Some examples of "unexplained" chronic pain include conditions such as chronic low back pain or chronic whiplash or fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome.

The research now shows that a concept of central sensitization is the underlying cause of this "unexplained" phenomena. Central sensitization is a process where the brain is receiving too many messages from the nerves to inform the brain that there is a problem with the body, which causes an over-sensitization of the problem.The brain is being over-bombarded with alarm bells that there is something wrong with the body.

By being educated on this concept and how central sensitization works can help to improve understanding of pain and how pain works.

A review on chronic unexplained pain discusses practice guidelines for explaining "unexplained" pain. This educational process involves two sessions lasting 30 minutes each approximately.

The first step in this process is to meet face-to face with a therapist in order to improve your knowledge on pain inlcuding:

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What A Physiotherapist Can Do For Osteoporosis?

What is osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis means porous bones. It is a progressive bone disease in which a loss of bone mass and density may potentially lead to fracture. It can affect all age groups and both males and females. Women are at greater risk of developing osteoporosis than men, mainly due to the rapid decline in oestrogen levels after the menopause.

Bone is a living tissue that is constantly being absorbed and rebuilt. As we get older more bone is naturally lost than is replaced. However In osteoporosis the bone mineral density is reduced even further. The structure of bone begins to deteriorate and the amount and variety of proteins in bone are altered. This causes bone to become more fragile and more at risk of fracture through a minor fall or bump. The spine, hip and wrist are most commonly involved.

What are the symptoms of osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is often referred to as the silent disease as it may not be diagnosed until a fracture has occurred. Fractures due to osteoporosis can lead to changes in posture (such as developing a stoop in your back), muscle weakness, loss of height and bone deformity of the spine.

Some people may experience pain in their bones and muscles, particularly in their backs. If you do experience any such symptoms and have some of the risk factors of osteoporosis it is important to talk to your GP.

The list of risk factors is extensive. Here are some of the more commonly associated risk factors:

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